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Which of these pieces of advice from Polonius's speech to Laertes do you agree with?

In William Shakespeare's Hamlet, the character Polonius gives some advice to his departing son, Laertes.

VotesAnswer
7Give thy thoughts no tongue,
8Nor any unproportion'd thought his act.
14Be thou familiar, but by no means vulgar:
12Those friends thou hast, and their adoption tried, grapple them unto thy soul with hoops of steel;
6But do not dull thy palm with entertainment of each new-hatch'd, unfledg'd comrade.
18Beware of entrance to a quarrel;
10But being in, bear't that th' opposed may beware of thee.
14Give every man thine ear, but few thy voice;
13Take each man's censure, but reserve thy judgment.
9Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy,
5But not express'd in fancy; rich, not gaudy;
4For the apparel oft proclaims the man,
12Neither a borrower nor a lender be;
11For loan oft loses both itself and friend,
9And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry.
17This above all - to thine own self be true, and it must follow, as the night the day, thou canst not then be false to any man.
1I don't agree with any of these.
7Other:


UserComment
Galomorro
posted 4-Jan-2011 8:30pm  
Other: I can't UNDERSTAND most of these phrases.
LindaH Survey Qualifier
posted 4-Jan-2011 10:51pm  
These seem reasonable...
Be thou familiar, but by no means vulgar:
Those friends thou hast, and their adoption tried, grapple them unto thy soul with hoops of steel;
But being in, (a quarrel) bear't that th' opposed may beware of thee.
This above all - to thine own self be true, and it must follow, as the night the day, thou canst not then be false to any man.
I guess you should beware of entrance to a quarrel if you don't know the other person well. If you know the other person and you know they can quarrel peacefully, well... nothing to 'beware' of, really.
I think taking each mans censure seems a bit weak. If you disagree with it, is it really necessary to 'take' it?
I have no idea why you wouldn't speak your mind (the first one suggests that?) or not act on a thought just because it wasn't well thought out. Some, sure> You don't want to do anything stupid. But not all "unproportioned" thoughts turn out to be a bad idea. If you spend too much time analysing every idea that pops into your head before acting on anything, you'd spend an awful lot of time thinking and not much time doing. (Am I not understanding that one?)
cloudhugger
posted 5-Jan-2011 9:06am  
Be thou familiar, but by no means vulgar: Keep it in your pants?
cloudhugger
posted 5-Jan-2011 9:17am  
I said yes to all of them. If he were to follow this advice, he would be a nice guy. A wealthy nice guy. Dressed nice too.
Oh, I'm not sure about the "apparel proclaiming the man", there are many idiots that dress smart.
Enheduanna Survey Central Subscriber
posted 5-Jan-2011 11:39am  
Most of this seems like very good advice. I don't especially agree with Give thy thoughts no tongue; But being in, bear't that th' opposed may beware of thee; or Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy, / But not express'd in fancy; rich, not gaudy (although I do agree that the apparel oft proclaims the man).
Jody
posted 5-Jan-2011 12:00pm  
Of course, every time I read "neither a borrower nor a lender be" I think of that Gilligan's Island episode....
cprasky
(reply to cloudhugger) posted 5-Jan-2011 9:41pm  
And many geniuses that dress sloppy. Albert Einstein often forgot to put on socks. He also had a bad habit of using his paychecks as bookmarks and losing them. And, while attending a Beethoven symphony with a friend, he sat and hummed Mozart through the whole thing... He might have been smart, but he could be annoying at times.
CarlHalling
posted 5-Jan-2011 9:58pm  
I think I pretty well agree with everything he says; Polonius is a good character; and it's a crying shame he ends up as he does; Hamlet was wronged for sure, but that was no excuse to destroy innocent lives like those of Polonius and his daughter Ophelia. I'd still like to play him though...
Iseult
posted 6-Jan-2011 6:02pm  
I read almost all of Shakespeare's tragedies. My trick for getting through them was to skip sililoquis (sp?) and speeches and just focus on the dialogue because it's relevant and easy to comprehend. Hence, I am just going to skip the speech.
jettles Survey Central Subscriber Survey Qualifier
posted 8-Jan-2011 9:45am  
Good survey biggles!!
Gomezy3k
posted 9-Jan-2011 10:49am  
Give thoughts no tongue
Beware of entrance to a quarrel
But being in, bear't that th' opposed may beware of thee
Give every man thine ear, but few thy voice
Neither a borrower nor a lender be
This above all-to thine own self be true, and it must follow as the night the day, thou canst not then be false to any man.
emogirl
posted 13-Jan-2011 12:09pm  
o don't agree with any of these
BABYD
posted 13-Jan-2011 3:22pm  
i don't know
LuridHope
posted 12-Aug-2011 3:52am  
Words to live by, but I'm not sure that clothes make the man.
LJD
posted 29-May-2013 11:09pm  
Proverbs 10: 19-21

19 - In the multitude of words there wanteth not sin; but he that refraineth his lips is wise,

20 - The tongue of the just is as choice silver; the heart of the wicked is little worth,

21 - The lips of the righteous feed many; but fools die for want of wisdom.
JessicaWoman99 Bronze Star Survey Creator
posted 21-Jun-2013 3:59pm  
I just do not know
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