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cerealkiller Bronze Star Survey Creator Gold Qualifier
#1 posted July 16, 2007 at 7:03pm (EDT)  
http://www.niagara-gazette.com/newtoday/gnnnewtoda...
darkshadowsseeker
#2 posted July 16, 2007 at 7:17pm (EDT)  
That's so very sick. The dog might have been in heat, but they definitely need to put that dog down to prevent this from ever occurring agan. My main concern is that the little boy is okay. What he went through isn't just physically traumatizing, but emotional too.
cerealkiller Bronze Star Survey Creator Gold Qualifier
#3 posted July 16, 2007 at 7:28pm (EDT)  
Huh? Since when do male dogs go into heat??? Male dogs of the 2-legged and 4-legged varieties are always in heat.
darkshadowsseeker
#4 posted July 16, 2007 at 7:46pm (EDT)  
Maybe they don't. I couldn't say for certain since I've never owned a male dog, only females. That being said, I wouldn't trust a dog that did this to a child. It's bad enough that some dogs will hump your leg when they are horny, but this dog sodomized a toddler.
cabinfever
#5 posted July 16, 2007 at 11:38pm (EDT)
edited July 16, 2007 at 11:38pm (EDT)  
Niagara County SPCA Executive Director Al Chille said he’s fielded dozens of calls about the dog, many from out-of-state, and the overwhelming sentiment has been in favor of the dog.

“It’s been, ‘Save the dog, investigate the family,‘ ” Chille said.


What a load of horsecrap. Kill the dog. The stupidest part was leaving a small child alone with a large dog. Then the mother yelling at and scaring the dog caused his penis to suddenly enlarge (happens with all dogs), and the dog ends up dragging the boy outside. I think that the boy's crapty butt caused the dog to suddenly want to exert his dominance. He smelled another animal's crap and had to 'defend' his territory and 'dominate' the interloper. Just another reason for me to say no to getting a dog.
I was attacked by a pit bull/boxer cross when I was seven... it tried to rip my throat out. Even now I get tense when I see large dogs running loose.
LoriJanine Survey Qualifier
#6 posted July 17, 2007 at 8:09am (EDT)  
cabinfever wrote:

Just another
> reason for me to say no to getting a dog.
> I was attacked by a pit bull/boxer cross
> when I was seven... it tried to rip my throat
> out. Even now I get tense when I see large
> dogs running loose.
>
I have a very hyper black lab mix, and he stays outside most of the time. My neighbors complain that he is outside too much. He is an outside type of dog and I have 2 toddlers. If they don't get it, that's their own problem.
EyesOfCharisma
#7 posted July 18, 2007 at 11:10am (EDT)  
I woulda killed that damn dog.
they Survey Central Subscriber Bronze Star Survey Creator
#8 posted July 18, 2007 at 11:28am (EDT)  
Dogs are what we make them.

cabinfever
#9 posted July 19, 2007 at 1:46am (EDT)  
And what the hell is that supposed to mean? That the family made the dog into a sodomist? This supposed family pet suddenly attacked a child... if he had bit the kid, there'd be no debate, he'd be euthanized. But since he butt-diddled a toddler, he deserves to live?
they Survey Central Subscriber Bronze Star Survey Creator
#10 posted July 19, 2007 at 7:16am (EDT)  
Did I say any of that? No.

Pets are what we make them.

I'll say it again and I'll keep saying it.

Unfortunately, when butt-holes raise a dog to be killers/attackers, there's really not many other options but to put them down. It has everything to do with how they're raised.



Calm down, why are you getting so upset? My comment had nothing to do with you. You seem agitated by me. Maybe you should put my name on your filter list.... I'm not even trying to upset you.
EyesOfCharisma
#11 posted July 19, 2007 at 9:48am (EDT)  
I had a dog who used to hump my leg. I didn't raise it to be a humper, I didn't teach it to hump me (It was a girl btw...) lol

Maybe if the dog would have bitten the kid, I would agree with the 'how we raise em' comment...

I wouldn't have let the state take the dog, I woulda shot it myself...
they Survey Central Subscriber Bronze Star Survey Creator
#12 posted July 19, 2007 at 11:06am (EDT)  
I guess I just feel like.... most of the time... people and animals that do bad things are a product of bad parenting/raising.

I know that there are exceptions.... sometimes it's just how their brains work.... something's just not firing right and they do bad things.... maybe that's the case with this dog. But in my opinion, the dog was not raised to have a respect for it's family. When I brought my daughter home from the hospital, my dog was very protective of her from the beginning. He would get frustrated with me if she cried, lay next to her while she slept, etc.... He loved her from the get go... probably because she was very obviously part of our family... He loved us, so he loved her.

This dog attacked his family.... one of the smallest in it. Doesn't really sound like something a beloved family pet would do.
EyesOfCharisma
#13 posted July 19, 2007 at 11:25am (EDT)  
This reminds me of that comment on the green mile... I want to go find that now...

brb

ok here goes...

Burt: Tell you something. You listen close, too, because it might be something you need to know.
Paul: I'm listening.
Burt: We had us a dog. No particular breed, but gentle. Ready to lick your hand or fetch a stick. Just a sweet mongrel, you know the kind. In many way, a good mongrel dog is like your negro. You get to know it, and often you get to love it. It is of no particular use, but you keep it around because you think it loves you. If you're lucky, Mr. Edgecomb, you never have to find out any different. My wife and I were not so lucky. Caleb? Come here for a second. (the son hesistates, ashamed) Please, son. (we see his son has a horrible scar on one side of his face) He has the one eye. I suppose he's lucky not to be blind. We get down on our knees and thank God for that much at least. Right Caleb? Okay, go on in now. That dog attacked my boy for no reason. Just got it into his mind one day. Same with John Coffey. He was sorry afterwards, of that I have no doubt. But those little girls stayed raped and murdered nonetheless. Maybe he's never done it before--my dog never bit before, but I didn't concern myself with that. I went out there with my rifle and grabbed his collar and blew his brains out.
Paul: I'm sorry for your trouble.
Burt: I'm as enlightened as the next man, Mr. Edgecomb. I would not bring back slavery for all the tea in China. I believe we have to be humane and generous in our efforts to solve the race problem. But we have to remember that the negro will bite if he gets the chance, just like a mongrel dog will bite if it crosses its mind to do so. Is Coffey guilty? Yes, he is. Don't you doubt it, and don't you turn your back on him. You might get away with it once or even a hundred times. But in the end, you'll get bit.

Ok, well... this isn't the best example... But yeah..
they Survey Central Subscriber Bronze Star Survey Creator
#14 posted July 19, 2007 at 11:46am (EDT)  
 * laughing out loud * I remember that part well.... I remember being irritated with that dude then. Hell, he's comparing the dog to an innocent man... so I can see why you say it's not a good example.  * raspberry *


But then, we don't know how that dog was raised.... If this were a true story...
thecomic22
#15 posted July 19, 2007 at 1:20pm (EDT)
edited July 19, 2007 at 1:51pm (EDT)  
I remember that line too, I read The Green Mile series then saw the movie. I would never completely trust any family pet no matter the size with my children. Animals can turn quicker then you can blink. Reminds me of something I saw several years ago on Dateline. This lady & her husband had a chow mix & like the passage, it was a sweet & loveable mongrel dog. Well the couple also had a baby girl. Chow didint like baby & constantly bit baby & snapped at baby. She refused to give it away, saying ''I believe when you raise a pet it's your soul responsibility to stick with that pet no matter what" Now had that been me, the 1st time that bastard bit my kid I woulda put a .16 gauge to its head. But, she put it through some kind of training school to ''correct'' the habit. They showed dog & baby in perfect harmony, claiming the dogs soul had been saved, rebuked, & all that or whatever. Yea well I myself dont buy that crap. If it's in a grown dogs nature to snap or bite it's always gonna be there & no amount of correction will change it. Especially with a breed like a chow or chow cross, which are highly aggressive anyway. Some people make me sick that they would rather put own their kids at risk of being attacked than get rid of the fudgein dog.
darkshadowsseeker
#16 posted July 19, 2007 at 1:37pm (EDT)  
The young son of a friend of mine got mauled & bitten in the face by an Akita. Up to this time, the dog had never attacked anyone, but had only been around adults, not any children. Some breeds aren't good around children because of their inate temperment. Akitas, chows, pit bulls, Dalmatians...these are just some of the breeds you should think twice about if you have children, especially young children in the household. Cocker spaniels used to be an ideal family dog, but over the years, breeders have inbred them so much to improve their looks (especially their ears), that now cocker spaniels are so tempermental & high strung that they aren't a good pet to have around small children.
thecomic22
#17 posted July 19, 2007 at 1:49pm (EDT)  
tillicus wrote:
> The young son of a friend of mine got mauled
> & bitten in the face by an Akita. Up to
> this time, the dog had never attacked anyone,
> but had only been around adults, not any
> children. Some breeds aren't good around
> children because of their inate temperment.
> Akitas, chows, pit bulls, Dalmatians...these
> are just some of the breeds you should think
> twice about if you have children, especially
> young children in the household. Cocker spaniels
> used to be an ideal family dog, but over
> the years, breeders have inbred them so much
> to improve their looks (especially their
> ears), that now cocker spaniels are so tempermental
> & high strung that they aren't a good pet
> to have around small children.


The only dogs I'd consider having around my kids would be either a basset hound or a pug. I'm not saying niether wont bite, but it's less likey.
cabinfever
#18 posted July 19, 2007 at 5:54pm (EDT)  
they wrote:

> Unfortunately, when butt-holes raise a dog
> to be killers/attackers, there's really not
> many other options but to put them down.
> It has everything to do with how they're
> raised.
When a dog is trained to attack and fight, then yeah, that is what they will do. But when a trusted family pet suddenly does something like this, they can no longer be trusted at all, no matter what.


>Calm down, why are you getting so upset?
Because a baby was viciously violated in a way that no one should even imagine. The dog deserves a .45 to the head. That poor boy will never be the same and will never forget.

> My comment had nothing to do with you. You
> seem agitated by me. Maybe you should put
> my name on your filter list.... I'm not even
> trying to upset you.

Yeah, it's weird how we been butting heads lately... I've never had a problem with you, not even a little bit. Just coincidence that two subjects I feel strongly about came up... and they intermingle to a degree: protecting children. I saw your comment as completely dismissing the dog's behavior and blaming the family for how it was raised. Too bad we don't have more information.

Ah, here's more info:

The dog was a 2-year-old pit bull that had been with the family since it was a puppy, Eggert said. Sunday’s incident was the first time the family had any problems with the dog being aggressive or biting, he said.

The boy underwent surgery on Sunday night and may need more reconstructive surgery in the future, Eggert said.




southernyankee
#19 posted July 20, 2007 at 10:01pm (EDT)  
I'd probably beat the dog with a belt on the spot for that, at the very least.
RGirl
#20 posted July 23, 2007 at 12:52am (EDT)  
I didn't read all of the posts after the article. If the boy was attacked something needs to be done with the dog but I doubt the dog thought 'I'm gonna sodomize that boy.' Dogs mount to show dominance, especially unneutered males and for sexual stimulation. I think it was coincidence that the boy didn't have a diaper on.
cerealkiller Bronze Star Survey Creator Gold Qualifier
#21 posted July 23, 2007 at 5:51pm (EDT)  
Yeah, it's not like the dog ripped off the kid's diaper with his teeth, threw him on the ground and butt-fudgeed him. "Crime of Opportunity" maybe?
Liss Bronze Star Survey Creator
#22 posted July 23, 2007 at 5:56pm (EDT)  
I agree. I think people get really hazy when it comes to dogs doing bad things. Most of the time they're just acting how they should. I don't think they should be killed for that.
cerealkiller Bronze Star Survey Creator Gold Qualifier
#23 posted July 23, 2007 at 5:59pm (EDT)  
Melrfaz wrote:
> I agree. I think people get really hazy when it
> comes to dogs doing bad things. Most of the time
> they're just acting how they should. I don't think
> they should be killed for that.

Except for when they attack someone and maul them. Okay, some dogs are human-trained to be that way, but once a dog bites/attacks they are no good anymore.
Liss Bronze Star Survey Creator
#24 posted July 23, 2007 at 6:06pm (EDT)  
Yeah, yeah, mauling is understandably bad.
cabinfever
#25 posted July 24, 2007 at 1:32am (EDT)  
And what this animal did isn't mauling? He tore that poor kid a new one... literally. That boy is going to need more than one surgery to repair the damage. And he's probably going to have a mortal fear of dogs the rest of his life. Can you imagine?? Being two...the world is small... you're toddling through the house, secure in the comfort of your home and the people who love you and the pet who is growing up with you... and suddenly, this 'pet' jumps on you and nails you? I'm against euthanizing animals just because you can't find a home for them within ten days... but after a dog precipitates such an attack... he can't ever be trusted with anyone again. If a bullet can't be found, then a vet's needle will do.
RGirl
#26 posted July 24, 2007 at 2:36am (EDT)  
I must have missed part of the article because I didn't read any details about the injuries. Anyway, as I said, when a dog attacks yes something needs to be done. The only reason I wanted to post anything was to say that I don't think dogs walk around with plans to rape children, maul them maybe, but not rape them.
cabinfever
#27 posted July 24, 2007 at 4:21pm (EDT)  
I agree with Pennyann that this mutt wasn't planning this attack... but the fact that he did it is reason enough to put him down.
Liss Bronze Star Survey Creator
#28 posted July 24, 2007 at 4:52pm (EDT)  
I never said the dog shouldn't be put down. I just think that you shouldn't own a violent pet in the first place. We don't even know what this family is like.
RGirl
#29 posted July 24, 2007 at 5:58pm (EDT)  
cabinfever wrote:
> I agree with Pennyann that this mutt wasn't
> planning this attack... but the fact that
> he did it is reason enough to put him down.

That's not what I said. I said mauling might go through a dogs mind, but not rape. I agree if a dog attacks these things need to happen. Be sure the dog wasn't provoked into attack. Look at the dogs breed, raising, and owners and determine whether or not the dog needs to be put down or the owner needs to be put down or both. I've never been in the head of a dog and for all I know a dog might contemplate mauling but I don't think a dog contemplates rape.
RGirl
#30 posted July 24, 2007 at 6:00pm (EDT)  
Wear does the article talk about the injuries the boy suffered? I don't see it.
Cleo
#31 posted July 24, 2007 at 6:16pm (EDT)  
Makes me love my kitties more each day!

cerealkiller Bronze Star Survey Creator Gold Qualifier
#32 posted July 24, 2007 at 6:34pm (EDT)  
From CF's post #18:

Ah, here's more info:

The dog was a 2-year-old pit bull that had been with the family since it was a puppy, Eggert said. Sunday’s incident was the first time the family had any problems with the dog being aggressive or biting, he said.

The boy underwent surgery on Sunday night and may need more reconstructive surgery in the future, Eggert said.
Cleo
#33 posted July 24, 2007 at 6:49pm (EDT)
edited July 24, 2007 at 6:50pm (EDT)  
So are they at a "lets wait & see if the dog will do this again to the child." mode? Or what?

How long should they wait to see if the dog will do this again? I say enough is enough! Times up!



Dogs! I just DON'T trust them! You'll NEVER hear of a kitty doing something like this!!
Makes me want to hate dogs even more. * angry *
cabinfever
#34 posted July 24, 2007 at 9:28pm (EDT)  
Pennyann: http://www.niagara-gazette.com/archivesearch/local...
http://www.niagara-gazette.com/archivesearch/local...

I don't think I misunderstood... you said the dog wasn't thinking about 'raping' the boy, and I agreed... but he may have been thinking about it in context to what you said earlier about dogs mounting to dominate. He didn't know what he did was sexual abuse, it was his way of aggressively asserting his dominance.
I still think that putting him down is the only way to make sure he doesn't do this again. Another article said that people are offering to adopt this mutt. They must be flat out of their minds... and I hope none of them have children.
RGirl
#35 posted July 25, 2007 at 1:09am (EDT)  
That is what I meant. Dogs mount to show dominance. They'll mount your leg, another dog of the same sex and they will mount a naked toddler who just so happens to have no pants on. That part was coincidence, but if the dog mauled the kid then that was not coincidence.

Ok. I read the first article. Do you know why the boy was injured, what caused it? For a minute I didn't. How on earth can a dog penis be so big it tears? Well, this is how, from Wikipedia-
"When copulating, a male canine initially mounts the female from behind, as with most tetrapods, a position known informally as doggy style. The female will hold her tail to the side (called "flagging") and allow this if receptive. If unreceptive she may sit or lie down, snap, move away, or otherwise be uncooperative or not allow mating. The male will often move about as he tries to get a good purchase upon her, and whilst attempting penetration of his penis to the female's vulva. At this point, the penis is not erect, it is slender and held rigid by a small bone inside, known as the baculum.

When the male achieves penetration, he will often hold tighter and thrust faster, and it is at this point when he is mating that the male's penis expands. Canine reproduction is different from human sexual intercourse, because human males become erect first, and then enter the female; canine males enter first, then swell and become erect.

The male dog has a bulbus glandis, a spherical area of erectile tissue at the base of the penis, which traps the penis inside the female's vagina during copulation as it becomes engorged with blood. [1]

Once the penis is locked into the vagina by the bulbus glandis, the male will usually lift a leg and swing it over the female's back while turning around. The two stand with their hind ends touching and the penis locked inside the vagina while ejaculation occurs, decreasing leakage of semen from the vagina. After some time, typically 5 - 20 minutes (but sometimes longer), the bulbus glandis disengorges, allowing the mates to separate. Virgin dogs can become quite distressed at finding themselves unable to separate during their first copulation, and may try to pull away or run. Dog breeders' websites often suggest it is appropriate for those involved to help calm and settle the mating dogs once this stage is reached, if they show anxiety, through until eventual separation.

Note that similar canine mounting behavior (sometimes with pelvic thrusting) is also used by dominant canines of both sexes. Dominance mounting, with or without thrusting, should not be confused with copulatory mounting, in which the thrusting is short term until a "tie" is achieved."

So the question is.........did this dog rape the kid? Sounds like to me mounting wouldn't have caused any trauma but having sex would. Honestly, I don't think the dog is a bad dog, not like human rapist is a bad person. You have to remember that dogs are dogs, we can't attribute human characteristics. I say neuter it and train it or give it away to some one without kids.
cabinfever
#36 posted July 25, 2007 at 1:26am (EDT)  
From that definition and description, it sounds like the dog was having sex with the toddler. All the more disturbing. That mutt had to know that he wasn't mounting another dog, let alone a male. Neutering a dog this late in life may or may not curb its need to be aggressive and dominate. I can't understand why anyone would want to adopt it, unless it's for some sick novelty value... "Yep! There he is... the toddler diddler!"

As I've said before, I am against euthanizing any healthy animal simply because the shelter can't find a home for them within 10 or 30 days, or whatever time limit most have. But when an animal goes nuts and does something so outrageous, dangerous, and damaging, it's time for a dirt nap. That is just my oh-pin-yun.
cerealkiller Bronze Star Survey Creator Gold Qualifier
#37 posted July 26, 2007 at 6:52pm (EDT)  
People who want the dog probably want him for sex, as in adult females or gay males. Have seen bestiality websites with dogs fudging human females, eating pussy, women blowing dog's dicks, etc.
cabinfever
#38 posted July 26, 2007 at 9:59pm (EDT)
edited July 27, 2007 at 2:25am (EDT)  
I hadn't thought of that, CK.... leave it up to you to think of that.
cerealkiller Bronze Star Survey Creator Gold Qualifier
#39 posted July 27, 2007 at 5:32pm (EDT)  
Of course. In a pinch a dog can help............
Otter
#40 posted July 27, 2007 at 6:00pm (EDT)  
My friend had three dogs and two daughters, one of the girls stepped on a dog's foot and the dog snapped at her. My friend went bullcrap on the dog, he called me and asked me to come over and shoot the dog, I told my friend I would bring over a pistol, but if he wanted to kill the dog, he'd have to shoot it himself. On my way to my friend's house his wife called me and told me he killed the dog with an axe because it snapped at him when he took it outside. My friend was a passive sort who didn't like to have guns in his house, I couldn't believe he killed his dog with an axe. He defended his action by saying he wouldn't have a dog he couldn't trust around his kids. Some dogs just shouldn't be in families with small children.
cerealkiller Bronze Star Survey Creator Gold Qualifier
#41 posted July 27, 2007 at 6:26pm (EDT)
edited July 27, 2007 at 6:29pm (EDT)  
I don't believe any dog is 100% safe 100% of the time around children, or cats either.

My favorite cat Bandit is normally gentle but occasionally he won't like me petting him and he bites me hard, drawing blood. He doesn't know how to "play bite". Most of the cats nibble or play bite when they want to be left alone, but Bandit doesn't. I warn the grandkids to be careful of him. They all love him and want to pet him but I tell them to back off when Bandit starts putting his ears down and the tail starts moving. I've learned the hard way myself.
cerealkiller Bronze Star Survey Creator Gold Qualifier
#42 posted July 27, 2007 at 6:28pm (EDT)  
Otter wrote:
> My friend had three dogs and two daughters, one
> of the girls stepped on a dog's foot and the dog
> snapped at her.


That was bullcrap. The dog wasn't at fault at all, just reacting to being stepped on. Foot probably still hurt when the father dragged him outside. That guy has no business having pets.
I woulda chewed out the stupid girl for being inattentive and hurting the dog.
cabinfever
#43 posted July 28, 2007 at 1:39am (EDT)  
I was thinking some of the same things, CK... the dog was reacting to being stepped on, but a lot of family dogs will whine or yip and move away. Having an aggressive response like that is not acceptable around children. But he didn't actually bite, so I'd probably drop him off at the shelter and tell them not to adopt him out to a family with kids.

Our cat Callie, the grouchy old dog, doesn't even lay her ears back or growl... all the warning you get might be a tail flick or two and suddenly she's trying to take your hand off. And this will be after she's jumped up into your lap to be petted. I think she's bi-polar. * laughing out loud *
Otter
#44 posted July 28, 2007 at 1:57am (EDT)  
When I was a child, my parents always had Boxers, we used to camp on the beach in Rhode Island on weekends. We had a couple near us one weekend, the woman had her child on a blanket and our boxer was laying nearby. When the woman saw her husband headed toward her, she got up from the blanket and went to the water. When her husband got to the blanket our Boxer wouldn't let him near his child. No one could get near her kid until she came back. Then our dog just laid down and went back to sleep. Boxers are very protective of children, even children they don't know. Some breeds are like that.
I agree that my friend over reacted, but in our years of friendship It was the only time I ever saw him pissed.
RGirl
#45 posted July 28, 2007 at 2:40am (EDT)  
About Boxers. I love them. We were driving along one day and there was this brindled Boxer trotting along in the middle of the street. It was obvious he wasn't supposed to be wandering and he still had part of the chain hanging from his collar. I guess it broke. We called him and he hopped in the car. It was a Sunday so we got to enjoy his company for a day before taking him to the shelter. (No ID tag). He followed commands and slept by our bed. Every time he heard a noise he sat up all alert. He was a great dog. On Monday we took him to the shelter and his owners had already been looking for him.
darkshadowsseeker
#46 posted July 28, 2007 at 2:50am (EDT)  
When my dad was a child (back in the 1920s), he owned a Boxer named Brownie. He told me that Brownie was the best, most faithful dog he ever owned & was very protective of both my dad & his mother (my grandmother). If anyone up to no good came on the farm, Brownie would deal with them.
Otter
#47 posted July 28, 2007 at 6:41am (EDT)  
They are wonderful dogs, especially around women and children. The only negative thing I can think of is they fart, our Bowers would cut farts that would curl your hair.
Irene007 Survey Central Gold Subscriber Bronze Star Survey Creator
#48 posted July 28, 2007 at 9:12am (EDT)  
I had a dog when I was a kid called Patches; a cute little mutt (mixed pomeranian and terrier) who once snapped at me. He didn't have a mean streak at all but he was in extreme pain when he did that; he had just broken his hip after getting hit by a car... Poor thing, he was so pitiful looking when we brought him to the vets and left him there. We picked him up the next day and just had to let him heal; we had to carry him out so he could do his business. We'd watch him from the window to see what he would do, and when he was well enough to walk around; he'd plop back down if he saw that we were watching him and wimper so we could go get him. He was such a faker!
Richard47
#49 posted July 28, 2007 at 1:53pm (EDT)  
cerealkiller wrote:
> Yeah, it's not like the dog ripped off the kid's diaper with his teeth,
> threw him on the ground and butt-fudgeed him. "Crime of Opportunity"
> maybe?


Everything could have been avoided if the dog used a little K-Y jelly. He was clearly unprepared!
RGirl
#50 posted July 28, 2007 at 6:14pm (EDT)
edited July 28, 2007 at 6:15pm (EDT)  
My Min Pin tried to bite the vet once, for real, all they did was put a muzzle on her. She never did it again. Had never done it before. We obviously didn't chose to shoot her. She was miserable, sick and the vet was trying to draw blood. That was when she was finally diagnosed with the low thyroid. As soon as she got her medicine she was fine and doesn't have a problem with blood drawing. She was just feeling so awful. In nursing I've had confused patients do violent or inappropriate physical things and we didn't 'put them down.' Interesting that we are quick to put a dog down but we let violent criminals get off on technicalities. I'm not arguing for violent dangerous dogs here, I'm just comparing methods of justice. People PLAN and PLOT murder. Dogs don't, they just react.
Richard47
#51 posted July 28, 2007 at 8:42pm (EDT)  
" I don't believe any dog is 100% safe 100% of the time around children, or cats either. "

***
I totally agree with that, CK. Look at Siegfried and Roy....loving all of those big cats, living with them, sleeping with them, eating with them.....then one day, a tiger is in a bad mood and just takes a swing at Roy. The tiger probably thought it was just a tap, but he cut Roy in half and he, then, suffered a paralyzing stroke. Being left alone with an infant, a cat or dog could do the exact same thing. Siegfried and Roy get a lot of money for putting their lives in danger. They know that there is always the possibility, even remote, that something will piss the cats off. That even happens with people!! But putting a baby in close proximity with a cat, dog, bird...whatever, unsupervised....the parent is taking the chance but it is the baby who gets hurt.
There is always the excuse that animals are put down because no one will adopt them once they are turned into the humane society. The humane part is not keeping the animal in a small cage with no room to move, and never enough food for years on end. Is that an acceptable quality of life for the pet? Illness runs rampart in these kennels/cages/dog pounds. They do not chop the animals head off (like chickens or cattle. That is the real sin!!), they are literally put to sleep painlessly. I know that it isn't ideal by considering the alternative life they may lead, it is humane.
I guess it is our western conception that death is a bad thing in being frightened of the unknown. I think it is much more cruel in how some people die. Faith tells me that there must be a reason.

cabinfever
#52 posted July 28, 2007 at 9:41pm (EDT)  
I thought of what Pennyann said earlier, too.... that while a vicious dog is euthanized, a vicious man is put in prison for a while and then released. Doesn't seem fair.
Richard47
#53 posted July 28, 2007 at 9:57pm (EDT)  
Cleo wrote:
> Makes me love my kitties more each day!


Well, Cleo...you have very small children at home. Sometimes cats think babies are playing with them, the babies are, more or less, oblivious at the presence of the cats (as human), thinking that they are just another silly toy.


|
Richard47
#54 posted July 28, 2007 at 10:46pm (EDT)  
' Interesting that we are quick to put a dog down but we let violent criminals get off on technicalities.'

That is so true! I know that during an attack, authorities are sometimes forced to destroy the animal, but why after the fact (?)...it is already done! At least give the owners a 'chance' to control their pet, as there may never be another incident again. Destroying the pet just makes people sad. It is hard enough for pets to find home.
cabinfever
#55 posted July 29, 2007 at 12:40am (EDT)
edited July 29, 2007 at 12:41am (EDT)  
Yeah, Richard, let's send a toddler-attacking dog back home to where the mother leaves her baby alone with the mutt in her 'chance' to control it. You are right, it's hard enough to find homes for all the shelter animals... why let one that is known to attack children take up space that a calmer, more family-oriented pet could have? Once an animal has done such a thing, it's pretty much given up its right to live... just as I believe that any human that commits such crimes have given up theirs. Just like animals, human murderers, rapists, child molesters will do it again, given the chance and circumstances. Granted, humans are more dangerous because they are more intelligent (supposedly).
Richard47
#56 posted July 29, 2007 at 12:52am (EDT)  
Cabinfever,
I think I was reponding to Penny's quote (below), in so much that it should be taken as a case by case basis, not immediate destruction. Humans have the final word, no matter what the circumstances.

"Interesting that we are quick to put a dog down but we let violent criminals get off on technicalities."
____________________________________________________________________________________________

"Just like animals, human murderers, rapists, child molesters will do it again, given the chance and circumstances."


* I am glad that you do not see things as all black or white. It makes the world a better place!

_____________________________________________________________________________________________
cabinfever
#57 posted July 29, 2007 at 1:48am (EDT)  
Richard47 wrote:


> * I am glad that you do not see things as all black or white. It
> makes the world a better place!

*Channeling Bugs Bunny:* He don't know me very well, do he? * wink *

Maybe you should ask Southernyankee about me. While I don't see everything black and white, there are many issues that I see very little gray in. Child abuse, for one.

Richard47
#58 posted July 29, 2007 at 2:00am (EDT)  
cabinfever wrote:
> Richard47 wrote:
>
>
>> * I am glad that you do not see things as all black or white. It
>> makes the world a better place!
>
> *Channeling Bugs Bunny:* He don't know me very well, do he? * wink *
>
> Maybe you should ask Southernyankee about me. While I don't see everything
> black and white, there are many issues that I see very little gray
> in. Child abuse, for one.
>
>
 * smile * ,
I am really not quite sure how we arrived at child abuse from the neccessity of putting a pet to sleep too hastily, but I will take your word for it that child abuse is a very emotional topic for you and a issue for which you have little, if any, latitude.
Richard47
#59 posted July 29, 2007 at 2:01am (EDT)  
Cabinfever,

Channeling Bugs Bunny:* He don't know me very well, do he?


*Do you mean Easter Bunny?  * wink *
cabinfever
#60 posted July 29, 2007 at 2:25am (EDT)  
Nope....
image
cabinfever
#61 posted July 29, 2007 at 2:27am (EDT)  
Richard47 wrote:
> I am really not quite sure how we arrived
> at child abuse from the neccessity of putting
> a pet to sleep too hastily, but I will take
> your word for it that child abuse is a very
> emotional topic for you and a issue for which
> you have little, if any, latitude.

I put up child abuse as an example... but if you read my posts, one of the major reasons I think that dog should be shot is because he attacked a child.
Richard47
#62 posted July 29, 2007 at 2:30am (EDT)  
cabinfever wrote:
> Richard47 wrote:
>> I am really not quite sure how we arrived
>> at child abuse from the neccessity of putting
>> a pet to sleep too hastily, but I will take
>> your word for it that child abuse is a very
>> emotional topic for you and a issue for which
>> you have little, if any, latitude.
>
> I put up child abuse as an example... but if you read my posts, one
> of the major reasons I think that dog should be shot is because he
> attacked a child.

Well, let's all hope that the owner of that pet made the best desicion possible for their particular set of circumstances. It's the best 'we' can do.
cabinfever
#63 posted July 29, 2007 at 2:42am (EDT)  
I tried to look for more information about what has been done about that animal, and couldn't find anything.
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